Press Start: Availability of Video Games for Classroom Application

One of the concerns I have as an educator interested in implementing technology, media, and video games in the classroom is whether or not I can guarantee access for all my students. If I cannot guarantee access for all of my students, I will not use video games in the classroom. This may cause some people to pause. After all, one of the driving forces behind the educational current sweeping the nation is technology. However, if students are becoming lost in this sea of innovation and excitement, we, educators, are doing something wrong. Continue reading “Press Start: Availability of Video Games for Classroom Application”

Press Start: Introductory Post on Gaming & Education Part 2

e51551_5ff0fd475e5b40f6b823e09264cf6e7bI previously provided a brief history, as it were, for my interest in implementing video games in the classroom along with some of the challenges educators face in attempting this task. I would now like to shift gears by going over the theories and principles that guided the teaching of my English 104 course and continue to inform my interests. Continue reading “Press Start: Introductory Post on Gaming & Education Part 2”

Press Start: Introductory Post on Gaming & Education Part 1

e51551_5ff0fd475e5b40f6b823e09264cf6e7bIf you have read through my “about” section you know that I have enjoyed playing video games since my youth but that in recent years I have developed a critical and academic interest in video games. I am going to begin a “Press Start” series of posts dedicated to my more critical interests and observations regarding video games and education. Continue reading “Press Start: Introductory Post on Gaming & Education Part 1”

Press Start: Literacy, Comprehension, and Transfer

During the previous semester, I found “Video Games, Reading, and Transmedial Comprehension,” by Brock Dubbels and attended a colloquium event at my university that addressed how students’ might transfer their technology skills from outside school into the composition classroom. I would like to specifically discuss Dubbels’ reasoning for an after-school game club and how this got me thinking about the ways student literacy practices might inform college courses. Continue reading “Press Start: Literacy, Comprehension, and Transfer”